Enceladus Fissures Keep Getting Warmer and More Complex

Small water ice particles fly from fissures in the south polar region of Saturn’s moon Enceladus in this image taken during the Aug. 13, 2010, flyby of the moon by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. Image credit: NASA/JPL/SSI

As Cassini scientists await the data from today’s flyby of Enceladus, images and data from August of this year have provided more insight into the active fissures on the icy moon’s south polar region. These geyser-spewing fractures are warmer and more complicated than previously thought.

“The exquisite resolution obtained on one segment of the Damascus fracture — one of the most active regions within the south polar terrain — has revealed a surface temperature reaching a staggering 190 Kelvin, or 120 degrees below zero Fahrenheit,” said Cassini imaging team lead Carolyn Porco, in an email announcing the new images. “Far from the fractures, the temperature of the south polar terrain dips as low as 52 Kelvin, or 365 degrees below zero Fahrenheit.” (…) Read the rest of Enceladus Fissures Keep Getting Warmer and More Complex (613 words)

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